3 tanzende Menschen

modern chimeras

The chimera, mythologically shifted into monstrosity and polyanimalism, is also illusory, an untrustworthy image, spawned by fantasy, something ephemeral and conceivable only as stuck in permanent transformation.

Wenn Sie das Video anklicken, wird es über Vimeo aufgerufen. Es gelten dann die Datenschutzbestimmungen von Vimeo

In an eponymous essay from 1895, H.G. Wells theorised the “Limits of Individual Plasticity”‒‒ the ideas further developed in the sci-fi novel The Island of Dr. Moreau‒‒in which he explored the question of how far living animals could be surgically or chemically modified towards human form. In a poetic sense, Modern Chimeras takes this notion a step further so ancient chimeras (with printed animal skins) and “animalistic” body language are associated into the present.

Modern Chimeras is also utopian in that it declares equality between creatures, the avoidance of hierarchies and an end to those crutches that are called coherence and order.

fotos: michael loizenbauer

Fibreland
Stefan Grissemann on Modern Chimeras

The flesh is willing, the tissue awake:
In Modern Chimeras a ritual pact is made between body, mind and fabric.

The chimera, mythologically shifted into monstrosity and polyanimalism, is also illusory, an untrustworthy image, spawned by fantasy, something ephemeral and conceivable only as stuck in permanent transformation. It is incomprehensible and not to be categorised. So some of the Modern Chimera figures that appear on stage, with all their many and diverse particularities, might seem lost. But “lost” here means something other than the subdued drama of the German expression “Verlorensein” because “lost” also resonates with pensiveness, being adrift in reverie, oblivious, with a prolonged state of confusion that can also be interpreted as a form of freedom or existential liberation. Whoever is in the position of being able to leave behind all social ascriptions and identity prisons has a good chance of living a reasonably autonomous life. Body positivity is unimaginable without mental balance. Those who are lost in thought have a soft landing, feathered by their aspiring uniqueness and old rituals whose origins can no longer be reconstructed – every creature is its own species.

The course of events is fixed, festivities and celebrations follow their preordained gestures, images, sounds and verbal fragments. A ceremony takes place whereby inner exigency and strict autonomy cannot be placed in doubt. The gods raise their animal-human heads to practice devotion and be honoured. The worshiped worship themselves in humility and self-aggrandisement, dissolved in the double meanings of their presence, the ambivalence of their fool’s gold divine existence. Chimeras keep their options open, make no decisions, can be and live anything. Flexible individuals are always re-constituting themselves in different constellations and are always in motion: the caravans move on and from a distance the processions call to mind what one used to call belief. The shadows are ephemeral cave paintings, intangible, while the sublime and the despised, the kings, queens and beetle-like creatures pass on by.

In an eponymous essay from 1895, H.G. Wells theorised the “Limits of Individual Plasticity”‒‒ the ideas further developed in the sci-fi novel The Island of Dr. Moreau‒‒in which he explored the question of how far living animals could be surgically or chemically modified towards human form. In a poetic sense, Modern Chimeras takes this notion a step further so ancient chimeras (with printed animal skins) and “animalistic” body language are associated into the present. How does communication function between hybrid entities?

This production is also utopian in that it declares equality between creatures, the avoidance of hierarchies and an end to those crutches that are called coherence and order. The multiplicities appears to be communicative, connected, but physically noticeably present too, not disembodied and remote: a post-digital model of pure materiality, a choreographed rhizome with roots that that are an unmanageable weave and network of branches which exhibit an immense connective capacity and flexibility. Feats of creative improvisation and adaptation provide the creaturely core of the figures with an overall indestructability, immunised against external impositions.

Modern Chimeras is anything but a costume parade. Neither is it a fashion statement unless one takes that in the very fundamental sense of existential; fabric not as clothing, covering or a “second skin”, but as an extension of the flesh, as if the object has, in some irritating, almost organic, way temporarily fused with the surface of the body. Considered more closely, skin is not just an outside phenomenon. Not only has the heart an inner skin, the shadow zones of bodily orifices also have mucous membranes that are internal extensions of the epidermis. This emphasises carnality: one penetrates, swells up, opens up, stretches out and is eviscerated. The calligraphy of the body in space can be read as an expression of the essential nature of the depicted figures: one could call this work a choreographological enterprise.

The “fabric-ated” character of the textile products corresponds to all that has long since been developed serially by high-tech medicine –manufactured, more highly evolved and optimised human bodies. A mesh, a “unity”, is created in woven fabric that has a protective and boundary function, which can also be a casing in which one can become a pupa and transform as in a cocoon. The figment of the imagination, Hirngespinst in German, that the chimera represents is even recognisable phonetically– sonically ‘spinning’–as the quasi-textile thread of the dreamers. In this enraptured sense, Modern Chimeras does not celebrate the suspense of a dramaturgically finely-tuned narrative but the very special “tensility” exhibited by body, mind and fabric.

 

31/07/2022

ImPulsTanz Vienna International Dance Festival, AT

29/07/2022 (premiere)

ImPulsTanz Vienna International Dance Festival, AT

dates

Dance, Choreography: Luke Baio, Stephanie Cumming, Dong Uk Kim, Katharina Meves, Dante Murillo, Anna Maria Nowak, Hannah Timbrell
Artistic Direction, Choreography: Chris Haring
Composition and Sound Concept: Andreas Berger
Light Design, Scenography: Thomas Jelinek
Costumes: Stefan Röhrle
Stage Management: Roman Harrer
Theory: Stefan Grissemann
Distribution: APROPIC – Line Rousseau, Marion Gauvent, Lara van Lookeren
Production: Marlies Pucher

Thanks to Jakob Lena Knebl and Hans Scheirl for the donation of props.

A production by Liquid Loft in co-operation with ImPulsTanz Vienna International Dance Festival
Liquid Loft is supported by the Cultural Department of the City of Vienna (MA 7) and the Austrian Federal Ministry of Arts and Culture, Civil Service and Sport (BMKOES).

credits

Wiener Zeitung, 01.08.2022

Der Reigen der Mischwesen / Verena Franke

Chris Haring zeigt in der Uraufführung “Modern Chimeras” auch Altbekanntes.

Ein großer Knäuel an Kleidungsstücken und Stoffen unterschiedlichster Texturen liegt in der Mitte der Bühne. Sieben Performer gehen einzeln in flottem Tempo auf den Berg zu, nehmen sich, was sie scheinbar benötigen, und bringen es auf die Seite. Und schon ist man in Chris Harings Universum der Farben und Stoffe eingetaucht, die im Lauf des Abends das eingespielte Liquid-Loft-Team (Luke Baio, Stephanie Cumming, Dong Uk Kim, Katharina Meves, Dante Murillo, Anna Maria Nowak, Hannah Timbrell) zu sich windenden Mischwesen, auch Chimären genannt, verwandelt. Und so nennt der heimische Choreograf Chris Haring sein jüngstes Werk, das am Wochenende im Rahmen des Impulstanz-Festivals im Wiener Odeon uraufgeführt wurde, “Modern Chimeras”.

Ein komplett neues Konzept seiner Arbeitsweise darf man sich nicht erwarten. Vielmehr entwickelt Haring dieses weiter und passt es dem aktuellen Thema an. Dieses Mal verzichtet er aber auf seine typischen Livevideo-Projektionen, und auch die Lippensynchronisationsspiele setzt er sehr gemäßigt ein. Dafür gibt es Tanzsequenzen, sodass nicht nur die Bühnenästhetik dominiert. Die Kostüme sind aus vorigen Produktionen wiederzuerkennen: ein Beitrag zum Klimaschutz.

Haring kostet in dieser Produktion die verzerrten Körperbilder und die daraus entstehenden neuen Wesen aus, die die Fähigkeit besitzen zu täuschen, zu tarnen und optische Verwirrungen zu stiften – in perfekt einstudierten Abläufen. Die mythologischen Chimären werden nun in Tier-Print-Kostümmotiven und sich krümmenden, schlängelnden und windenden Bewegungen in die Gegenwart geholt. Manches davon scheint bereits in einer früheren Performance gesehen, manches ist aber erfreulich neu.

tanz.at, 03.08.2022

Liquid Loft / Chris Haring mit “Modern Chimeras” / Rando Hannemann

Im 17. Jahr ihres Bestehens zeigte die Kompanie Liquid Loft des Wiener Choreografen Chris Haring die Uraufführung ihrer neuesten Kreation „Modern Chimeras“ bei ImPulsTanz. Liquid Loft bleiben sich treu. Ihre künstlerischen Stilmittel, die ganz eigene Bild-Ästhetik und Sprach- und Stimmspiele sind unverkennbar. Auf den Einsatz von Life-Kameras verzichtete Chris Haring jedoch. Und das ist nicht das einzig Neue.

Die seit vielen Jahren in variierenden Settings, mal als Gruppenstück auf der Bühne, als Film, Online-Format oder in getrennten, durchschlenderbaren Museumsräumen gehörig ausgeweidete Thematik der deformierten, vereinsamten, entfremdet-posthumanen Kreatur bearbeitete Chris Haring in einer Vielzahl von Stücken, selbst in seinem „Schwanensee“ mit TANZLIN.Z am Landestheater Linz (tanz.at berichtete) in diesem Frühjahr. Die TänzerInnen der Kompanie entwickelten gemeinsam mit ihrem Choreografen und dem Sounddesigner Andreas Berger, wie Cumming Gründungsmitglied, Bewegungs- und performatives Material, das mit viel Witz und durch live projizierte Nah- und Innen-Aufnahmen der Körper die kühle Ästhetik der Choreografien durchbrach.

„Modern Chimeras“ nun, durch Covid-Fälle in der Kompanie war die Premiere gefährdet, musste bis zum letzten Moment angepasst werden an die aktuelle Besetzungs-Situation. Im Ergebnis für Außensitzende nicht wahrnehmbar, aber zusätzlicher Vorpremieren-Stress für die Kompanie.

Die sechs TänzerInnen (Luke Baio, Stephanie Cumming, Dong Uk Kim, Katharina Meves, Dante Murillo, Anna Maria Nowak) tragen den Haufen Stoff in der Mitte der weißen, säulengerahmten Bühne ab, ziehen sich um. Es bleiben zwei riesige Kissen, silbern und golden, und etwas wie ein schwarzer Torso mit einem langen Rüssel und gold-glitzerndem Appendix. Lauter, drängender Metall-Sound. Von der ersten Sekunde an. Die eingespielte Stimme lippensynchron mitgesprochen, Posen wie auf alt-ägyptischen Malereien und in griechischen Skulpturen gesehen, synchrone Bewegung auf die Pose zu, unterbrochen von kurzen Pausen. Ständiger Kostüm-Wechsel. Raubkatzen schleichen im Staccato-Move über die Bühne.

Die Chimäre, das von der griechischen Mythologie geborene Mischwesen, ist ebenso auch Trugbild und Einbildung. Sie hat also physischen und geistigen Charakter, ist Wirklichkeit und falsche Vorstellung von dieser. Passiv erlegen oder aktiv erzeugt, (Be-) Trug und erSCHEINung schaffen heute neue, mächtige Mythen, die als solche zu entlarven vielfach nicht gelingt, weil die Verhaftung in der Innen-Ansicht Fremdbild nicht erlaubt. Und die Gewalt, mit der die inneren Trugbilder uns gefangenhalten, wird nur in der Angst vor ihrer Zerstörung spürbar. Zudem halten Krawatten, Soutanen, Turban, Kaftan oder Waffen tragende Doppel-Moralisten heute unsere Welt in atemlosem Lügen-Trab. Aktueller also, und fundamentaler, kann ein Sujet kaum sein.

Hier setzt Haring an mit seinen modernen Chimären. Deren Varianten-Reichtum choreografiert er im neoklassizistischen Ambiente des Odeon in berückenden Bildern. Der Lichtdesigner und Szenograf Thomas Jelinek schafft dafür Räume und Atmosphären, die kongenial die Dynamik der Performance unterstützen. So wie der Sound von Andreas Berger. Seine Klang-Welten und Sprach-Stimm-Installationen sind maßgeblich für das ästhetische Gesamtbild der Arbeit.

Die Choreografie orientiert sich an Bewährtem, Altbekanntem, gibt neuen Bildern jedoch neuen Raum. Die Kostüme von Stefan Röhrle, er entwickelte neben vielfältiger Individual-Kleidung eine Reihe von äußerst dehnbaren Stoffen, die das Umschließen von bis zu sechs PerformerInnen erlauben. Deren leichte Transparenz ist auch Hinweis auf die Möglichkeit des Erkennens und Entlarvens all dieses Scheins.

Das häufige Wechseln der (Ver-) Kleidungen, die Posen und Skulpturen-Gruppen, in die Hüllen und Häute der Anderen gekrochen, gezwängt oder von diesen eingefangen und -gewickelt, der amöbenhafte Wandel der Formen, die sich hier ausstülpen und dort einengen, viele, im großen Raum verteilte parallele Einzel- und Gruppen-, solistische und synchronisierte Aktionen, tänzerische und performative Sequenzen erzeugen ein hochkomplexes, dichtes Stück voller eigenwillig-schöner Bilder. Tierisch-menschliche Figuren, animalisch-humaner Habitus und manchmal einfach nur der Typ von nebenan, der ganz kurz einmal erkennbar zu sein scheint, tanzen zwischen Abstraktion und Fiktion. Den Zuschauenden lockt Haring mit Intimität und hält ihn weiter auf Distanz, auch weil Video-Leinwand gänzlich und der in seinen Stücken oft so köstliche Humor weitgehend fehlen.

Mischwesen und Trugbilder zu allen Zeiten und auf allen Kontinenten, in allen Lebensformen und vielen Dimensionen zeigt uns Liquid Loft, großartig geschlossen agierend, in „Modern Chimeras“. Die Wandlung als Daseinsform, als Wesenskern des Lebens. Die universelle gegenseitige Durchdringung (wir alle sind psycho-genetische Chimären) lässt Neues entstehen, ermöglicht Evolution.

Das Stück feiert das widerstandslose Sich-Hingeben an die ständige Veränderung. Ein Duett zweier Stretch-verhüllter Tänzer – die Gesichter drücken sich aus dem Textil und, während sie sich winden, lamentieren ihre Stimmen lautmalerisch rau – überwindet die Distanz-Barriere und schleicht sich ein in das Gefühl. Es gibt keine Grenzen. Wir sind Alles, Eines.

Der Standard, 01.08.2022

Helmut Ploebst

Die alten Griechen dachten sich aufregende Ungeheuer aus. Zum Beispiel die Chimaira, zu Deutsch “Geiß”, als Mischwesen aus Löwe, Schlange und Ziege. Heute werden mythische Mischwesen, in die auch menschliche Körper involviert sein können – die Sphinx, der Kentaur –, allgemein als Chimären bezeichnet. Im übertragenen Sinn ist eine Chimäre auch ein Trugbild. An Letzteren gibt’s bekanntlich gerade keinen Mangel.

Deswegen ist das neue Stück Modern Chimeras der Wiener Kompanie Liquid Loft unter ihrem Choreografen Chris Haring ein Treffer. In dieser Uraufführung bei Impulstanz feiert das Trugbild als Mischung aus Menschen, Masken, Stoffen und Einbildung sinnlich angehauchte Urständ. In Sachen postmoderner Gestaltwandlung ist die gefragte Tanzgruppe ja schon seit beinahe zwanzig Jahren Chefin.

Luxusprobleme

Währenddessen hat sich das kulturelle Umfeld gewandelt. Dank des Bildungsmediums Internet schaffen Einbildungen Fakten, was eine Hochblüte des Identity-Shoppings miteinschließt. In Modern Chimeras tanzt der gängige Drang, sich zu verwandeln, mit einer für Liquid Loft eher untypischen Ernsthaftigkeit an. Ein halbes Dutzend Tänzerinnen und Tänzer posiert anmutig und souverän in ständigem Fluss und Hüllenwechsel.

Es scheint, als würden hier die Luxusprobleme einer saturierten Gesellschaft, die sich aus Furcht vor der Krisenwirklichkeit in ihrem Körperverpackungsmüll verspreizt, abgefeiert. Dieses Elysium des Narzissmus deutet – als Utopia im Karzer eines Schutzraums – nach außen die Leere einer eingebildeten Befreiung an.

reviews